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The Story of Ubud Monkey Forest

brown monkey on brown wooden fence
Photo by Oliver Schmid on Pexels.com

Ubud Monkey Forest is one of Bali’s most visited tourist attractions. It’s a sacred sanctuary for over 700 crab-eating macaques, as well as other species such as gibbons, owls, roosters and deer. The forest is located a 5-minute walk from the center of town and includes three temples: Pura Dalem Ubudraja, Pura Taman Saraswati and Pura Padangtegal. A strong presence of spirits guides the life in the forest and each area of the park has a different monkey tribe with specific rules to follow during visits (see below).

Ubud Monkey Forest is also a sacred sanctuary and a place of worship for the Balinese, and it’s also where they protect their beloved monkeys. The forest is home to over 200 long-tailed macaque monkeys who live in the trees and have free access to food, water, and shelter provided by visitors. The Balinese believe that these animals are messengers from the gods, so they do not harm them or try to capture them. The monkeys enjoy this freedom—but don’t let them get too comfortable! The best way to experience Ubud Monkey Forest is with an open mind and an appreciation for these fascinating creatures (and if you visit when there are babies around…you won’t regret it!).

Ubud Monkey Forest is located a 5-minute walk from the center of town and includes three temples.

Ubud Monkey Forest is located a 5-minute walk from the center of town and includes three temples. The main temple, Pura Dalem Agung Padangtegal, houses a statue of the deity Hanuman on its inner wall. Said to be one of the most sacred sites in Bali, this temple is not open to tourists; it’s reserved for ceremonies and ritual practices only.

Other than that, there are two other temples within Ubud Monkey Forest: Pura Goa Gajah (“Elephant Cave Temple”) and Pura Sakenan (also known as “Water Temple”). Pura Goa Gajah is dedicated to Hanuman and has been around since at least 10th century CE; legend holds that it was once used by King Airlangga for meditation purposes. The very first water temple in Indonesia was created here in 1252 CE under orders from King Jayaprabhupta; it remains one of the oldest structures on this island!

Each area of the park has a different monkey tribe

There are three areas in the park, each with its own monkey tribe. Each tribe is governed by a leader, and each has its own territory, food source and home.

The western area of the park is home to the Balinese Sacred Monkey Forest Sanctuary (BSMS), which is comprised of two different tribes: The Ngelatu Tribe, who live on one side of BSMS; and the Kintamani Tribe, who live on another side.

The eastern area of Bali’s Monkey Forest contains another two groups: The Padangtegal Tribe lives near a large tree known as “Pohon Gedong” (or “Tall Tree”). This tree has been there for hundreds of years and serves as an important symbol for Balinese culture. The other group lives along an irrigation canal called “Canal Pengaselan” (or “Gardening Canal”).

The sanctuary contributes to scientific research about primates.

The sanctuary also contributes to scientific research about primates, which benefits the monkeys and their forest home. Research on primate behavior at Ubud Monkey Forest is used to help protect other species of primates in Indonesia as well as people living in areas where they live.

The sanctuary also contributes to scientific research about primates, which benefits the monkeys and their forest home. Research on primate behavior at Ubud Monkey Forest is used to help protect other species of primates in Indonesia as well as people living in areas where they live.

With these tips, you’ll have an awesome time at Ubud Monkey Forest!

  • Don’t feed the monkeys.
  • Don’t touch the monkeys.
  • Don’t take photos of the monkeys (flash photography is a big no-no).
  • Wear neutral colors that don’t stand out—black, white, gray and khaki are good choices if you want to blend in with your surroundings while at Ubud Monkey Forest. Bright colors like reds and yellows will attract unwanted attention from these primates!
  • Be aware of your surroundings at all times: watch where you’re walking so as not to step on any critters who might be crossing paths with you; make sure there aren’t any low hanging branches or vines around before continuing forward; look up often so that way if an errant monkey starts coming towards you from above then at least there’s time for him or her (it’s usually them!) to avoid getting smacked accidentally…or worse yet…deliberately!
  • If possible avoid visiting during either night or day since those are prime times when humans tend not only see but interact positively with their furry friends—and even worse yet: encourage others nearby not just within hearing distance but perhaps further away too via social media platforms such as Facebook​and Twitter​(and now Instagram). These poor creatures need rest too!

Conclusion

We hope you’ve enjoyed learning more about Ubud Monkey Forest. It is a fascinating place, and we encourage you to visit it on your next trip to Bali. This sanctuary is one of the most popular tourist attractions on the island, and for good reason: It has beautiful views, interesting history and culture, as well as fascinating wildlife. We hope that this guide will help you plan an unforgettable experience at this sacred sanctuary!

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